Saturday, September 7, 2019

Saturday's Critters #299

Welcome to Saturday's Critters!


If you love all God's creatures like I do and also like to blog about them and take critter photos this is where you can share your critter post. Link up your post and share your critters, join in with my critter party ! You can share any kind of critters the real ones, pretend ones, statues and paintings, a new or old post!

I may be on my blog break, if so I will catch up with comments ASAP.



I am sharing some archived images, 3 Swan species that are found in the USA.  The first and most recent photo is of the Mute Swan seen at Bombay Hook NWR in Delaware. The Mute Swan is the easiest swan to id with it's orange bill. The Mute Swan is non-native in the USA. 




The second swan is native to Maryland the Tundra Swan. The Tundra Swan is seen in huge groups in the late winter months. My Tundra photo below was taken in Pennsylvania in the month March. 





The third swan is the Trumpeter Swan usually seen in the western states but sometimes can be found in Maryland. My Trumpeter photo below was taken in Washington State. The obvious difference between the Tundra and Trumpeter Swans is the size. The Trumpeter Swan is larger than the Tundra Swan, there is also a difference in bill shapes. I personally would need to see both swans up close to notice the bill shape. 




Random rants and in the news, for the critter lovers:


In the news, the EDF (Environment Defense Fund) is helping to restore 30,000 acres of Monarch butterfly habitat. The population of the western Monarch is down 86% last year. Habitat creation and conservation will help the Monarch along their migration pathway. The Monarch can travel an amazing 3000 miles to reach their winter home in Mexico. Some of the Western Monarchs will overwinter in Southern California where conditions are similar to Central Mexico. To stay warm tens of thousands Monarchs will cluster together on one tree. 

You can report your Western Monarch sightings here  .

I can count on my two hands how many Monarchs I have seen in the summer of 2019. The Monarch below seems to like our Buddleia or butterfly bush. The Monarch migration on the east coast is usually in October unless the weather gets colder earlier.



The biggest reason for the decline in the Western Monarch population is due to habitat loss and pesticide use across their range. Weather, such as heavy rainstorms and the wildfires also contribute to the population loss. Monarch population east of the Rockies seems to be doing better compared to the western population which is in a free fall. We can all help by planting milkweed and flower species that contain nectar and eliminate the use of pesticides.  












I appreciate and thank everyone who links up their post and for all the wonderful comments !


Here is a list of my linky parties;

Also visit:  I'd-Rather-B-Birdin. Thanks to the gracious host: Anni.

44 comments:

  1. Hi Eileen!

    Det var både goda och dåliga nyheter, det är sannerligen dags att vi börjar återställa det som vi förstört i naturen. Vi har gjort livet svårt för alla naturens innevånare, ibland av oförstånd men alldeles för ofta för egen vinnings skull. Jag håller tummarna för den vackra Monarkfjärilen!

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  2. Have you ever seen a Black Swan in the US? Native to Australia they are the bird emblem for Western Australia but I have never seen so many as I have since moving to Tasmania.....the only other place I have seen them is in the UK. Hope you have had (or maybe still having) a great holiday!

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  3. Hi Eileen, it was magnificent to see all those beautiful swan photographs... so many gathered on the tundra one - so lovely.
    Reading your rant, isn't it a shame how habitat and pesticides can take such a toll on our delicate creatures. Your photo of the Monarch is gorgeous. All the best and enjoy your blog break :D) 💝

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  4. Swans are beautiful, graceful and elegant. Beautiful butterfly. Enjoy your blog break and looking forward to your return. Happy weekend!

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  5. Hello Eileen,
    Beautiful pictures of the swans, the butterfly is really beautiful.
    Photo 2 are so many swans together, that is really great to see.
    Do you want to add my link, I still can't do it.
    Best regards, Irma

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  6. Hari Om
    Adore that Tundra Swan shot! And love your 'rant' for the Monarchs!!! Happy Saturday. YAM xx

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  7. love both swans and the Monarch. I saw the trumpeter swan in Yellowstone. :)
    In Sweden we have the Mute and the Whooper swans.
    Wishing you a nice break. :)

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  8. Thanks for your beautiful post and pics.
    Greetings.

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  9. Hello Eileen,

    Beautiful images! The Swans are so pretty, and so are The Monarchs too. I hope they will come again in your area.
    Happy Weekend!

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  10. Sempre é muito bom passar aqui e ver tuas fotos tão lindas e no capricho! beijos, tudo de bom,chica

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  11. Pretty shots, the butterfly is gorgeous and I love the group of Tundra Swans.
    Have a lovely weekend, Eileen and thanks for hosting.

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  12. I don't remember when I last saw a Monarch... also we always have flocks of summer butterflies, this year I have seen less than 10 all summer.

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  13. Great photos of the swans and butterfly.

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  14. Hello Eileen: I am interested to see the Mute Swans in Delaware. A friend of mine lives in Maryland and a few years ago she told me that they had a total cull of Mute Swans in Maryland, but I wonder whether the swans from adjacent areas have found their way back there. It always distresses me when we bring a species into an area, then decide it is too much, or ill advised, and kill it off.

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  15. ...I NEVER see as many Monarchs as I'd like to see. Thanks for hosting Eileen.

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  16. I knew the western population had problems. There are two populations, east and west.
    The eastern population was up 144% at the Mexico wintering site. We've had hundreds of eggs and caterpillars in Ontario. Their number are way up.
    Thanks for hosting.

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  17. I wonder if I have ever seen the Trumpeter Swan...I doubt I have. I love seeing the Mute Swans. I think they are so elegant.

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  18. That’s a great move by the EDF to preserve these beautiful species and I think every country faces such loss of any habitation. Beautiful photos on three different swans! Happy Weekend

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  19. I saw a dead monarch (probably had fallen off a car) on the pavement of a parking lot last week, and couldn't even pick up the wings. I can only count on one hand the ones I've seen this summer. Such a beautiful critter. Thanks for the swan i.d. info. Have a great weekend!

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  20. Hello Eileen,
    a break is always welcome, in any human activities. Enjoy it!
    I am back from a short holiday in the Italian Riviera.
    Thanks for hosting and have a nice time!

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  21. I have seen soooo many Monarchs this year, Eileen! I was out for 45 minutes walking yesterday and saw 7. They seem to be everywhere fluttering about. You may see some of ours near you soon! Thanks for the swan lesson.

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  22. The swans are so elegant! Beautiful!

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  23. Hello Eileen. Thank you for sharing that information about swans. Many people do not realise there are many species of swan throughput the world,some of them quite different to each other, just as you show.

    Such a shame about the Monarch. You are right to broadcast these shaming statistics. Enjoy your weekend and the week ahead.

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  24. OH Eileen so beautiful the swans! I love them!
    The butterfly is very beautiful!
    Fabulous pictures.
    I wish you a good weekend
    Ailime

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  25. Fabulous photographs Eileen.
    I hope you are enjoying your blog break.

    All the best Jan

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  26. When I think of a swan the Mute one comes to mind with the orange bill. I didn't realize there were different ones.

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  27. Nice swans! I've not seen a Monarch for at least the past 2 months. Very few of other species as well. They practically disappeared after Hurricane Irma two years ago. One of the few I did see had a wing tag and I reported it. It was from our local south Florida non-migratory population.

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  28. The swan is a beautiful bird we have black swans in Western Australia.
    Merle.......

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  29. Oh no, I would have thought they were plentiful, I wonder if people know to plant milkweed and flowers with nectar. I'm sure the use of pesticides is responsible for all sorts of nasty things. I thought of you today when we saw some lavender grey birds and something that was either a hawk or falcon.

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  30. I've noticed that many parks in Virginia have pollinator habitat now that includes milkweed. Thanks for hosting.

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  31. I think half the monarchs in the world are living at my friend Susan's house in Northern Michigan this week. When we stopped by the day before Labor Day there were so many at her bush -- and she said there have been times she's seen more!

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  32. Improving the habitat for those we get so much pleasure out of is a must. I am grateful that I was given the opportunity 4 years ago, to learn what to do and how to do it!...:)jp

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  33. Hermosos los cisnes Eileen. Su belleza impresiona. Este verano apenas he visto mariposas, el año pasado sí, y es una pena de mucha alegría verlas.
    Te deseo un gran septiembre amiga.
    Buen domingo.
    Un abrazo.

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  34. i have seen very few monarchs this year also. i will be adding to my butterfly garden next year and i think i will encourage monarchs as well!!

    the swans are so pretty, i love seeing big groups like that!!

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  35. Wonderful swan photos and delightful monarch too!

    Happy Day to You,
    A ShutterBug Explores,
    aka (A Creative Harbor)

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  36. I think I've seen like 3 monarchs this season so far, I hope to see more...Im trying to introduce more common native flowers into my spaces here at home. So far I've had little luck with milkweed, so Im going to try the Butterfly milkweed I have some seeds! I have seen it grow here in this sandy soil. Love the Swans..

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  37. Fabulous photos!!

    I've seen a number of Monarch's this summer - So many are planting milkweed for them, which is wonderful! I also saw swans on a trip to Lancaster PA on Friday, and I took a wrong turn - I was lost, so not in the mood to take any photos, and after I made my course correction, I thought I should have!

    Hope you had a good weekend!

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  38. Beautiful Trumpeter Swans, they were superb.

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Hello, thank you for visiting my blog. I always appreciate your comments.

BTW, Anonymous comments unless a name is included will not be published. Also, comments with links will be deleted.

Have a happy day, Eileen

Saturday's Critters # 387

Welcome to Saturday's Critters! Hello and happy Saturday!    If you love all God's creatures like I do and also like to blog about t...